Talking about diabetes to a teenager

They have little time for themselves, and most of the unscheduled time they do have is spent communicating online, text messaging, or phoning friends.

Also discuss the diabetes diagnosis with your other kids, who might be jealous of the extra attention their sibling gets or concerned about developing diabetes themselves.

Talking to Your Child About Diabetes

His parents felt as though they constantly nagged him about his diabetes care. Kids in grade school through middle school should be learning how to take on some of their diabetes care, but still need parental involvement.

Your teen can help prevent this by not mixing uppers with other drugs or alcohol, and drinking non-alcoholic drinks and water. However, as Jessica moved into her teens, her behavior around her diabetes care changed.

I'm not quite sure when it was I went to the doctor and my normal doctor wasn't there it was someone else who was like, 'Look you're being an idiot.

When this happens, what is a parent to do. We recommend that the maximum intake is no more than three units a day for men and not more than two units a day for women.

Honest, open communication is key when talking to kids and teens about diabetes. They said they appreciated having more independence from adults in their lives, but at the same time they needed plenty of emotional support from their families, friends and medical teams. Sometimes, just knowing that there is an interested parent or other team member available to support and encourage him is all that is needed.

So let your teen know that you will be checking his meter memory or uploading his pump data to a computer periodically to see how he is doing.

This makes it easier for you to spot when problems are likely to arise and helps your child to be open with you. Although when I was just started lower sixth, so no I was seventeen. I mean I would just, ignored it so I refused to talk about it I guess. Adolescents with diabetes have trouble making their diabetes a priority in their lives.

A A A The teenage years are a time of physical, mental, and emotional growth. Bear in mind these figures are for adults. Also discuss how having your child take responsibility for diabetes can make it easier to go to fun events like parties and sleepovers.

In addition, diabetes care issues can become a focal point for conflict, even if the real sources of conflict have little to do with diabetes. Drugs can affect people — and their diabetes — in different ways, depending on the type, amount and purity of the drug.

If your child is too busy or too disorganized to perform his diabetes care tasks, help to show him how it might be done. Help your teenager keep clinic appointments and encourage them to talk to their healthcare team.

You're gaining loads of weight. Some adolescents, especially girls, omit insulin doses as a way to control their weight. It may not be diabetes causing his depression, but diabetes care suffers because of it.

Talking to Your Child About Diabetes

Teens have a tough time doing something — or not doing something — today because it will have an effect on them in the future. So it never felt like [sneeze], like that much of a problem. They have little time for themselves, and most of the unscheduled time they do have is spent communicating online, text messaging, or phoning friends.

There are probably as many reasons for lapses as there are teens, but there are some common issues that contribute to poor diabetes management during adolescence. Tips for helping your teen The good news is that most teens who have periods of giving up on their diabetes care eventually mature and start to do better again.

I'd rather, you know, not let diabetes win and do whatever I want to do. When she was much younger, her parents monitored her blood glucose levels, recorded the numbers, measured and supervised her food intake, and made frequent adjustments to her insulin doses.

In addition, high blood sugars themselves have a direct and temporary effect on mood, increasing irritability, frustration, or sadness. Advertisement Jessica Jessica is 15 and has had diabetes for 9 years.

Diabetes type 1

People are busier than ever, and we encourage our children to be busy and involved. Avoid using terms like "cheating" and "being bad" if your child veers from the diabetes management plan.

When she was much younger, her parents monitored her blood glucose levels, recorded the numbers, measured and supervised her food intake, and made frequent adjustments to her insulin doses.

Getting Started Be sure to talk to your child in an age-appropriate way and to always tell the truth. Find Out More Social support is a key ingredient to adjusting to and managing type 1 diabetes in teens and adults.

However, as Jessica moved into her teens, her behavior around her diabetes care changed. Jessica was relieved to know that she had help in her self-care and that she, her health-care team, and her parents could all come up with a plan that could work for her.

Here are some of them:. Managing diabetes is a daily challenge. There are so many variables to keep in mind -- food, exercise, stress, general health, etc. -- that keeping blood sugar levels in the desired range is a. Home > About Diabetes > Kids & Diabetes > When Your Teen Just Quits: Diabetes and the Teenage Years.

When Your Teen Just Quits: Diabetes and the Teenage Years. Updated January 13, If your teen isn’t sticking to his diabetes regimen, talk to your physician or educator about simplifying it.

Teens generally want more independence when it comes to food and fun. Diabetes and Reproductive Health for Girls Learn about how diabetes affects a girl's reproductive health. Talking to your teenager about diabetes As your child develops their adult personality, they will want to start taking control of their life.

Diabetes Forecast

Many parents worry that their child won’t look after their diabetes as well as they do, which could make them unwell both in the short and long term. As a result, high glucose levels are common in teens. When adolescents reach their full growth, these insulin-inhibiting hormones tend to decrease.

As a way to compensate for these changes, talk with your doctor about possibly increasing your teen’s insulin during these years. Talking With Teens -- Tips for Better Communication. Parents and teens can bridge the communication gap with a little patience and a healthy measure of R-E-S-P-E-C-T.

Talking about diabetes to a teenager
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Talking to your teenager about diabetes | Diabetes UK